Sexual Assault & Sexual Harassment

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harrassment

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Sexual Assault from The National Center for Victims of Crime:
Sexual assault takes many forms including attacks such as rape or attempted rape, as well as any unwanted sexual contact or threats. Usually a sexual assault occurs when someone touches any part of another person’s body in a sexual way, even through clothes, without that person’s consent. Some types of sexual acts which fall under the category of sexual assault include forced sexual intercourse (rape), sodomy (oral or anal sexual acts), child molestation, incest, fondling and attempted rape. Sexual assault in any form is often a devastating crime. Assailants can be strangers, acquaintances, friends, or family members. Assailants commit sexual assault by way of violence, threats, coercion, manipulation, pressure or tricks. Whatever the circumstances, no one asks or deserves to be sexually assaulted.

Additional Sexual Assault Resources:
RAINN

Pandora’s Project: What is Sexual Assault
National Sexual Violence Resource Center
USDOJ: Sexual Assault/National Organizations
FBI: Sex Offender Registry
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Injury Prevention & Control – Violence Prevention
Men Stopping Rape, Inc.
WCSAP: Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, Curricula
WCSAP: Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, Resources and Publications
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Sexual Harassment from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include “sexual harassment” or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature.

Harassment does not have to be of a sexual nature, however, and can include offensive remarks about a person’s sex. For example, it is illegal to harass a woman by making offensive comments about women in general.

Both victim and the harasser can be either a woman or a man, and the victim and harasser can be the same sex.

Although the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

Additional Sexual Harassment Resources:
ED.gov Office for Civil Rights
RAINN: Sexual Harassment
NSVRC: Sexual Harassment
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